wired:

[via DesignTaxi]
A cheat-sheet for the Avengers’ strengths, weaknesses.

Sweet

wired:

[via DesignTaxi]

A cheat-sheet for the Avengers’ strengths, weaknesses.

Sweet

You make widgets? I thought you made cricket bats. — and 9 more things *not* to say in a job interview

Where was this 3 months ago!

(via guardian)

Try This At Home

pumasailing:

To make a Caipirinha you will need:

1 lime

1 tablespoon sugar

1/2 cup cachaca or 1/2 cup white rum or 1/2 cup vodka 

ice

Directions:

  1. Cut the lime in quarters then cut them crosswise.
  2. Put lime and sugar in a tall glass and mash (also try adding kiwi or strawberries)
  3. Add the same amount of liquor on the lime juice and stir
  4. Add ice and stir again

Or you can always hop on a plane and come visit us at the Itajai stopover!

Oh yes! (Taken with instagram)

Oh yes! (Taken with instagram)

futurescope:

BOEING’s aircraft for 2045: SUGAR Freeze

It doesn’t have crazy swept wings and it doesn’t fly at Mach 7, but this concept aircraft from Boeing is what we’ll all probably be stuffed into by 2045. It runs on cryogenic liquified natural gas, and beats the fuel efficiency by the current generation of passenger jets by a whopping 60%.
NASA has been doing its best not to get swept away with crazy concepts, and the agency is busy commissioning studies from companies such as Boeing looking for realistic (and we should emphasize that: realistic) projections for the next few generations of passenger aircraft. NASA numbers these generations starting with “N+1,” where “N” refers to aircraft like the 777 and “+1” is the generation following that, of which the Dreamliner is a start.
For generations N+3 and N+4 (between 2035 and 2045), Boeing put forward a concept called SUGAR Freeze, where “SUGAR” stands for Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research, and Freeze is referring to the fuel: cryogenically stored liquified natural gas (LNG). It’s reasonably tame looking, with the most distinguishing feature being low-drag, truss-braced wings, but the airframe itself is extremely lightweight and efficient.
The LNG propulsion system was chosen due to low fuel burn and low emissions, coupled with projected low price and high availability that seems likely to persist through at least 2035. LNG would be burned in unducted-fan hybrid engines, and these engines would be hooked up to a fuel cell that would in turn power a thruster mounted on the rear of the fuselage (pictured above: that ring at the tail), which would re-energize the wake of the aircraft to significantly reduce drag. Put all this stuff together, and you get an aircraft that’s as much as 64% more efficient than a 737-800.
The reason that NASA is looking so far ahead is that it takes easily 20 years for even the least crazy technologies to make it through the research and development process into production aircraft, and NASA needs to know where to focus what is — at this stage — just basic research. But this stuff is realistic, and it’s likely the direction for the future of commuter aircraft. This isn’t to say that there won’tbe sleek scramjet-powered airplanes zipping around the world, but even by 2045, that overbooked flight from Newark to Atlanta is much more likely to be on something like SUGAR Freeze.

[via] [more]

futurescope:

BOEING’s aircraft for 2045: SUGAR Freeze

It doesn’t have crazy swept wings and it doesn’t fly at Mach 7, but this concept aircraft from Boeing is what we’ll all probably be stuffed into by 2045. It runs on cryogenic liquified natural gas, and beats the fuel efficiency by the current generation of passenger jets by a whopping 60%.

NASA has been doing its best not to get swept away with crazy concepts, and the agency is busy commissioning studies from companies such as Boeing looking for realistic (and we should emphasize that: realistic) projections for the next few generations of passenger aircraft. NASA numbers these generations starting with “N+1,” where “N” refers to aircraft like the 777 and “+1” is the generation following that, of which the Dreamliner is a start.

For generations N+3 and N+4 (between 2035 and 2045), Boeing put forward a concept called SUGAR Freeze, where “SUGAR” stands for Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research, and Freeze is referring to the fuel: cryogenically stored liquified natural gas (LNG). It’s reasonably tame looking, with the most distinguishing feature being low-drag, truss-braced wings, but the airframe itself is extremely lightweight and efficient.

The LNG propulsion system was chosen due to low fuel burn and low emissions, coupled with projected low price and high availability that seems likely to persist through at least 2035. LNG would be burned in unducted-fan hybrid engines, and these engines would be hooked up to a fuel cell that would in turn power a thruster mounted on the rear of the fuselage (pictured above: that ring at the tail), which would re-energize the wake of the aircraft to significantly reduce drag. Put all this stuff together, and you get an aircraft that’s as much as 64% more efficient than a 737-800.

The reason that NASA is looking so far ahead is that it takes easily 20 years for even the least crazy technologies to make it through the research and development process into production aircraft, and NASA needs to know where to focus what is — at this stage — just basic research. But this stuff is realistic, and it’s likely the direction for the future of commuter aircraft. This isn’t to say that there won’tbe sleek scramjet-powered airplanes zipping around the world, but even by 2045, that overbooked flight from Newark to Atlanta is much more likely to be on something like SUGAR Freeze.

[via] [more]

(via futurescope)

erikacervantes:

If Walking Dead Zombies Were on Facebook…
…there’d be a whole lotta brain pics in your feed.
Gruh,Erika 

erikacervantes:

If Walking Dead Zombies Were on Facebook

…there’d be a whole lotta brain pics in your feed.

Gruh,
Erika 

sexymachinery:

LHD

The Large Helical Device (LHD) project involves construction of the world’s largest superconducting helical device, which employs a heliotron magnetic field originally developed in Japan. The objectives are to conduct fusion-plasma confinement research in a steady-state machine and to elucidate important research issues in physics and engineering for helical plasma reactors.

shapeways:

Everything You Wanted to Know About 3D Printing But Were Too Afraid to Ask)
3D printing is a mind-blowing process, but you might be surprised to learn that it’s not a new technology. It was developed in the late ’80s and has been used extensively for prototyping. What’s new is that the technology is no longer reserved for big companies — in  recent years, it has finally made the jump to the mainstream consumer  market.
In 2007, some higher-ups at Philips Electronics had a hunch that people would be interested in being more involved in  the products they buy. They decided that 3D printing could help them  deliver that functionality. A few people in Philips’ in-house incubator  approached a fellow employee, Peter Weijmarshausen,  and asked whether he thought it was a viable business idea. “I was  really intrigued. I thought, ‘How could this work? If we could really  give the power of making whatever you want to everybody, that’s a  game-shifter,” he recalls.
Weijmarshausen created a business plan for the first round of seed  funding, built a prototype that was ready by February 2008, and launched  Shapeways.com in July 2008. At launch, the machines only printed in plastic, but as  the market grows and the technology matures, Shapeways is able to offer  more materials and more affordable prices. Shapeways certainly isn’t the  only player in the 3D printing spaces — there are dozens of companies in business around the world — but Shapeways is unique in that it’s a marketplace that is naturally  more consumer-facing than its counterparts. With a more mainstream  audience, Shapeways is tasked with making 3D printing approachable,  understandable and affordable to everyday consumers. The company is  backed by Union Square Ventures and Index Ventures, and has produced more than one million 3D-printed items since its inception.

shapeways:

Everything You Wanted to Know About 3D Printing But Were Too Afraid to Ask)

3D printing is a mind-blowing process, but you might be surprised to learn that it’s not a new technology. It was developed in the late ’80s and has been used extensively for prototyping. What’s new is that the technology is no longer reserved for big companies — in recent years, it has finally made the jump to the mainstream consumer market.

In 2007, some higher-ups at Philips Electronics had a hunch that people would be interested in being more involved in the products they buy. They decided that 3D printing could help them deliver that functionality. A few people in Philips’ in-house incubator approached a fellow employee, Peter Weijmarshausen, and asked whether he thought it was a viable business idea. “I was really intrigued. I thought, ‘How could this work? If we could really give the power of making whatever you want to everybody, that’s a game-shifter,” he recalls.

Weijmarshausen created a business plan for the first round of seed funding, built a prototype that was ready by February 2008, and launched Shapeways.com in July 2008. At launch, the machines only printed in plastic, but as the market grows and the technology matures, Shapeways is able to offer more materials and more affordable prices. Shapeways certainly isn’t the only player in the 3D printing spaces — there are dozens of companies in business around the world — but Shapeways is unique in that it’s a marketplace that is naturally more consumer-facing than its counterparts. With a more mainstream audience, Shapeways is tasked with making 3D printing approachable, understandable and affordable to everyday consumers. The company is backed by Union Square Ventures and Index Ventures, and has produced more than one million 3D-printed items since its inception.